Region 5 AAAAAA GAMEDAY Roster(s)

Region 5 AAAAAA – GAMEDAY

08 – 28 – 15

Click on TEAM Logo for Roster Information:


              Cherokee     @        North Forsyth        

 


       Etowah     @        Sequoyah  


       Lassiter Trojans      @      Kell Longhorns    


       Alpharetta Raiders      @      Milton    


       Pope Greyhounds      @      South Cobb Eagles    


       Roswell Hornets      @      Centennial Knights    


       Marietta Devils      @      Walton Raiders    


       Wheeler Wildcats      @      Harrison    


   Woodstock       @       Johns Creek   


Region 5 AAAAAA SCHEDULE

GHSA 2015 Region 5 AAAAAA

Why Football Matters

Why Football Matters, By John Harbaugh

Posted Apr 22, 2015

Football is under attack, but the game and the values it instills in young men are critical to our society.

The game of football is under attack.

We see it every day in the headlines and on the news. The medical concerns are pressing. The game has taken its share of criticism. President Barack Obama said that if he had boys he wouldn’t let them play football. Even LeBron James has publicly said no football in his house.

The question is asked over and over:  Why would anyone want to play football? And why would anyone let their kids play?

Here’s my answer: I believe there’s practically no other place where a young man is held to a higher standard.

Football is hard. It’s tough. It demands discipline. It teaches obedience. It builds character.

Football is a metaphor for life.

This game asks a young man to push himself further than he ever thought he could go. It literally challenges his physical courage. It shows him what it means to sacrifice. It teaches him the importance of doing his job well. We learn to put others first, to be part of something bigger than ourselves. And we learn to lift our teammates – and ourselves – up together.

These are rare lessons nowadays.

Football has faced challenges like this before.

In 1905, there were 19 player deaths and at least 137 serious injuries. Many of these occurred at the high school and college levels. Major colleges said they were going to drop football because the game had become too violent.

That’s when President Teddy Roosevelt stepped in to call a meeting with coaches and athletic advisers from Harvard, Princeton and Yale. He wanted to find a way to make the game safer. They made significant changes, introducing new rules like the forward pass and the wide receiver position. Those changes turned football more into the game we know it as today.

We made progress. Rules changed. Society evolved. The game advanced.

We’re at another turning point in our sport. The concussion issue is real and we have to face it.

We have to continue to get players in better helmets. We have to teach tackling the right way, and that starts at the NFL level. Change the rules. Take certain things out of the game. It’s all the right thing to do.

But even with all of that, the importance of football hasn’t changed. In some ways, it’s more important than ever.

And I believe the most critical place for football is at the youth and high school levels. For 97 percent of football players, the pinnacle of their careers is the high school game. Few players ever go on to the college level. Even less make it to the pros.

For a lot of these kids, it’s not until it’s all said and done, and they look back on it several years later, that they realize the difference the sport made in their lives. They are proud of playing the game. Have you ever met anybody who accomplished playing four years of high school football, and at the end of that run said, ‘Man, I wish I wouldn’t have played’? It doesn’t get said.

We know that football players aren’t perfect. Nobody is. But millions of former players, one by one, can recount the life-altering principles they learned from football.

They know the value of football is the values in football.

That’s why high school football – and particularly high school coaches – play such a vital role in our society. Our football coaches are on the front lines of the battle for the hearts and minds of the young men in our society. The culture war is on and we see it every day. These young men are more vulnerable than ever.

How many youth and high school coaches serve as a father figure to their players? How many mothers look to the coaches of their son’s football team as the last best hope to show their son what it means to become a man – a real man? More than we’ll ever know.

Coaches teach our young people the lessons of life that very often they learn from no one else. Coaches have the kind of influence in our schools, and with our young people, that is difficult to come by.

Billy Graham once said, “One coach will influence more people in one year than the average person will do in a lifetime.” My dad also says all the time that it just takes one person to believe in a young man or young woman to change their lives. I couldn’t agree more.

Our culture teaches us to judge an activity by how it’s going to make us feel right now. But football doesn’t work that way. The game challenges and pushes us. It’s often uncomfortable. It requires us to be at our best.

Isn’t that what we want in our society?

Football is a great sport. Football teams can be, and very often are, the catalyst for good in our schools and our communities. Millions of young men have learned lessons in football that they could only learn through playing this game. Football has saved lives.

That is why football matters.

Lutzie Field a Reality!

 

June 26, 2015
Missy Koslowski, GHSA News

Cobb County School Board Approves Lutzie Field Dedication

Lassiter has worked very hard with the Cobb Community to muster support for an extremely good cause.  Hundreds of supporters have worked tirelessly to re-name Lassiter High School’s new field after Auburn football player and former Lassiter High School stand-out, Philip Lutzenkirchen.

This morning, GA News received news that the Cobb County School Board “unanimously” approved the project.

Special thanks go out to Bob Penter who lead the effort and the entire Lassiter Community!

As I believe you’ve all heard at this point, we received unanimous approval from the Cobb County School Board for Lutzie Field last night.  Afterwards, I spoke to each of the board members, and they were extremely complimentary of the way that we handled the process and situation. I want to thank each of you individually and the various groups that you represent for your support throughout this process.  You all were unwavering in your support and willingness to demonstrate it publicly.  While the end result looked easy, I’m convinced that the project would have died on the vine had we not aggressively pushed the project and the timeline. There are so many people to thank that it would be impossible to do so in a reasonable length note. The advice and support that I received throughout the process were invaluable.  However, I do want to especially thank Kyle Cooper of Property Masters.  Most of you know about the tremendous financial commitment that Kyle and Property Masters have made to the project.  He jumped on board early to make the project come alive.  When the project looked like it could die a couple of times in the past month, he was unwavering in his support.  He’s a huge friend of the Lassiter community, and I’m proud to be associated with him as a board member of the Lutzie 43 Foundation. With this process now behind us, we get to focus on the project itself and the longer term mission.  Please mark your calendars for the field dedication (including the 2nd annual “13 Can Make a Difference Food Drive”) on Friday, August 14 and for the inaugural Lutzie 43 Road Race (sponsored by FCA) on August 15.  There will be much more to come on both in the coming weeks. The work will begin on Monday, June 29th, exactly one year after Philip’s death.  God truly is working, so we should all smile.”

Clark Kent (WR) selected to FBU “Top Gun”

FBUTopGun-NoBackground

May 29, 2015   Missy Koslowski, GHSA News

This summer is not a time of rest for those “elite” athletes that seek to get Bigger, Faster, Stronger and to Improve their Skills.

A local Marietta, GA athlete (Clark Kent, Lassiter) competed last week against his peers at the FBU (Football University) combine held at Peachtree Ridge High School.  After these three days, former NFL receivers like Billy “White Shoes” Johnson and Stacey Bailey, evaluated the top receivers and picked the best for “Top Gun” (Dublin, OH).

ClarkKent_001_08_15_2014_3

Clark competed against many 4 and 5 star Defensive Backs in 1-on-1 and 7-on-7 drills to earn a spot in this highly coveted event.  College scouts follow this event and consider it an opportunity to see (what competitors do) against “The Best of the Best”. (Top Gun Itinerary – HERE)

logo

No event is bigger than Football University

TOP GUN

TOP GUN athletes are given the unique opportunity to practice the techniques and skills they have been taught against athletes who are as big, as strong, as fast, and as gifted as they are.

They also are blessed with the chance to impress the best group of NFL faculty ever assembled at one camp. TOP GUN will feature approximately 70members of the coaching staff that have more than 700 years of combined NFL coaching and playing experience! These coaches share their immense knowledge of the game to the athletes through on-field drills as well as detailed classroom film breakdowns.

Every year at TOP GUN, several rising seniors are picked to play in the U.S. Army All-American Bowl.

The MOST Important aspect for Wide Receivers – Creating SEPERATION

Separation

When discussing receivers, the typical evaluator will discuss size, speed, strength, hands, body control, and route running.  Hands, speed, and strength are pretty self-explanatory. Body control is more about a receiver’s ability to haul in the ball while he’s in the air. Route running is about a receiver’s ability to make sharp cuts and that gives him a better chance at getting separation.

Separation is the Holy Grail for a wide receiver. Being able to put space between his self and a defender is a quarterback’s best friend. It allows the QB to be more confident in his read and his throw.

It also has a big advantage in tight coverage.

I know that sounds confusing. If there is tight coverage, then it doesn’t seem like the receiver has separation, right?  A lot of times a receiver must separate himself from a defender while the ball is in the air. There are very nuanced and subtle ways to do this that many receivers overlook. The best receivers in the league can fight off defenders with subtle tactics to create separation just before the ball arrives that essentially makes the defender incapable of defending the pass.

In New England, Brandon Lloyd and Wes Welker were two of the best at these very sly ways of separation. Welker has continued that tradition in Denver, and it’s a big reason why Peyton – and Brady before him – trusted Welker so much even though diminutive in stature and speed.

This catch against the Colts in week seven is a perfect example.

The Setup

Crucial situation. The Broncos are trailing 39-30 against the Colts. It’s 3rd and 17 in the 4th quarter and only 4:45 left. If the Broncos don’t get a 1st down here, the game is pretty much over. Peyton Manning shows his trust in Wes Welker to win in a tough situation.

Welker - Presnap

Welker is running a seam route up the numbers here. He has a hard outside stem and puts the cornerback on his inside hip. The corner will jam Welker off the line of scrimmage but the strong outside stem allows Welker to get into his route without much disruption to the timing.

Welker - All22 Throw

Cornerback Darius Butler is stride for stride with Welker on this route when the throw is made. The ball is in the air and Butler has great position. This coverage is about as good as it gets.

The Separation

Welker - Broadcast Stiff Arm

Welker is listed at 5-9 and 185 lbs. and is used to having to find ways to get separation. The route here will help Welker with that, but most importantly, note his hand placement on cornerback Darius Butler. He’s not shoving Butler, instead this is more of an arm bar while the ball is in the air.

Welker - Arm Zoom

This is a better shot of Welker’s hand placement. Notice how it’s low and under the shoulder. This is really a form of offensive pass interference but the lower the hand placement, the less likely it is to get called. This is actually a call that offensive players get away with on a regular basis, but Welker is the master of it.

Welker - Field End Zone arm route

You can see that Welker is angling back into the numbers. This throw is supposed to be thrown a yard or two outside the numbers to keep the safety from getting involved. Manning will throw it perfectly, except Welker is angling his route slightly back into the middle of the field. This drives the corner, who is on his inside hip, further away from the ball location. Welker’s use of his hands and feet have put Butler, who has played this route perfectly, in a position where he actually doesn’t have a play on the ball as it comes down.

The Catch

Welker - Catch

The ball is placed perfectly just outside the numbers. Welker has used his hands and feet to create separation when he extends for the ball. Butler, who initially was blanketing Welker, is now just an innocent bystander watching Welker haul in the pass.

This is a great example of how Welker can use subtle techniques to create spacing. This is a hard skill to evaluate as many scouts can overlook this principle. Welker likely learned it instinctively because he’s had to fight against bigger and faster corners his entire life. Larger receivers are less likely to have these subtleties down because they’ve never had to resort to them.

This is one of the largest factors in a wide receiver’s ability to win on throws down the field. Even a little separation can mean the difference between a deflection or a catch. When running routes down the sidelines, receivers will sometimes slow their feet while the ball is in the air and then speed up while using their elbow or arm to help create separation. Randy Moss and Brandon Lloyd were fantastic at this tactic.

In football it’s the details that matter. It can mean the difference between an incompletion or an explosive play for a touchdown. With such a small margin for error every week, it would benefit receivers to practice these tactics often.

Cherokee Wins Close One at Homecoming

October 19, 2014
Missy Koslowski, GHSA News

Homecoming at Cherokee  Homecoming at Cherokee 2014  Homecoming at Cherokee 2014

HOMECOMING at Cherokee High School was arguably the best game of the week in the GHSA schedule and came down to the last 56 seconds, as the Warriors trailed Lassiter 52 – 49 and had the ball inside their own 20 yard line.

#4 Spencer Ashley  #10 Andrew Harris  #8 Brittain Brown

On the next play from scrimmage, #10 Andrew Harris caught a short screen pass from QB #4 Spencer Ashley and took it 86 yards to the Lassiter 4-yard line where #8 Brittain Brown scored on a short run play to win the game.

#5 QB Russell Aarons  #87 Pearson Van Horn

 #20 Mason Waters  #33 Ozi Orijoke

Lassiter led at halftime 31 – 14 with a tremendous effort by #5 Russell Aarons who returned to the field from a recent injury.  The Lassiter offense put up some impressive numbers by #87 Pearson VanHorn WR, #20 RB Mason Waters and some very hard running by #33 Ozi Orijoke.

#8 Micah Grigsby  #8 Micah Grigsby

There were heroics on both sides of this contest as Cherokee trailed 31 – 14 as the third quarter began and #8 Micah Grigsby returned the second half kick-off 95 yards for a score making it 38 – 14. Two fumbles and an interception changed the momentum in favor of the Warriors and they outscored the Trojans 35 – 7 in the second half.  At one point, Cherokee had four unanswered touchdowns to claw back into the game.

GHSA News Online “Players-of-the-Game” were:

CHEROKEE – #8 Brittain Brown (27 for 196 yards), #4 Spencer Ashley (14-of-22 for 272 yards, 3 TD’s and 66 yards rushing)

#8 Brittain Brown  #4 Spencer Ashley

LASSITER – #5 Russell Aarons (30-of-41 for 289 yards, 3 TD’s) and #20 Mason Waters (18 carries for 122 yards)

#5 Russell Aarons  #20 Mason Waters

This was a heartbreaker for the Trojans and they played with a lot of HEART!  This game literally came down to the last 56 seconds!  Congratulations to Cherokee for a hard-fought win on Homecoming Night 2014.

Homecoming at Cherokee 2014  Homecoming at Cherokee 2014 Homecoming at Cherokee 2014

Homecoming at Cherokee 2014

Roster and TEAM links (Select Helmet or “Roster”):

Cherokee Roster     ROSTER

Lassiter Trojans     ROSTER

It is first about HEART and DESIRE then SIZE and SKILL

heartPro Football Weekly

NFL PLAYER SPECIFICATIONS ________________

The following are physical attributes, personality traits, and other characteristics for Offensive, Defensive, and Special Teams positions that professional scouts look for in draftees and recruits.

Adapted from Pro Football Weekly NFL Prototypes (Draft Guide 2011, Spring 2011).

_________ OFFENSE _________

QUARTERBACKS

Height:  6’2”

Weight:  215 lbs

40-yd Dash:  4.9 sec

Arm Length:  31”

Hand Span:  9”

Intelligence:  Superior

Characteristics:

Toughness, Intelligence, Decision-making, Accuracy, Confidence, Work ethic, Leadership
__________

WIDE RECEIVERS

Height:  5’11”

Weight:  185 lbs

40-yd Dash:  4.5 sec

Arm Length:  31”

Hand Span:  9.5”

Intelligence:  Above Average

Characteristics:

Body control, Routes, Separation, Soft hands, Speed, Intelligence
____________

FULLBACKS

Height:  6’0”

Weight:  240 lbs

40-yd Dash:  4.75 sec

Arm Length:  31”

Hand Span:  9”

Intelligence:  Average

Characteristics:

Toughness, Soft hands, Power, Blocking, Versatility
__________

RUNNING BACKS

Height:  5’10”

Weight:  215 lbs

40-yd Dash:  4.58 sec

Arm Length:  31”

Hand Span:  9”

Intelligence:  Average

Characteristics:

Competitiveness, Balance, Vision, Speed, Versatility
__________

TIGHT ENDS

Height:  6’3”

Weight:  250 lbs

40-yd Dash:  4.85 sec

Arm Length:  32”

Hand Span:  9.5”

Intelligence:  Above Average

Characteristics:

Routes, Soft hands, Run after catch, Blocking, Intelligence
__________

OFFENSIVE TACKLES

Height:  6’5”

Weight:  300 lbs

40-yd Dash:  5.2 sec

Arm Length:  32”

Hand Span:  9”

Intelligence:  Superior

Characteristics:

Awareness, Balance, Recovery, Strength, Intelligence
__________

OFFENSIVE GUARDS

Height:  6’3”

Weight:  300 lbs

40-yd Dash:  5.17 sec

Arm Length:  32”

Hand Span:  9”

Intelligence:  Above Average

Characteristics:

Strength, Hand/Foot quickness, Intelligence
___________

CENTERS

Height:  6’3”

Weight:  290 lbs

40-yd Dash:  5.2 sec

Arm Length:  32”

Hand Span:  9”

Intelligence:  Superior

Characteristics:

Base strength, Hand/Foot quickness, Decision-making, Intelligence

_________ DEFENSE _________
SAFETIES

Height:  5’10”

Weight:  195 lbs

40-yd Dash:  4.55 sec

Arm Length:  30”

Hand Span:  9”

Intelligence:  Above Average

Characteristics:

Instincts, Intelligence, Tackling, Coverage skills, Range, Speed

CORNERBACKS

Height:  5’10”

Weight:  185 lbs

40-yd Dash:  4.5 sec

Arm Length:  30”

Hand Span:  9”

Intelligence:  Average

Characteristics:

Instincts, Confidence, Soft hands, Closing speed, Coverage skills

INSIDE LINEBACKERS

Height:  6’0”

Weight:  235 lbs

40-yd Dash:  4.7 sec

Arm Length:  31”

Hand Span:  9”

Intelligence:  Above Average

Characteristics:

Instincts, Tackling, Balance, Leadership, Decision-making, Intelligence

OUTSIDE LINEBACKERS

Height:  6’2”

Weight:  230 lbs

40-yd Dash:  4.7 sec

Arm Length:  32”

Hand Span:  9”

Intelligence:  Above Average

Characteristics:

Instincts, Athleticism, Range, Tackling, Intelligence

DEFENSIVE ENDS

Height:  6’3”

Weight:  255 lbs

40-yd Dash:  4.75 sec

Arm Length:  32.5”

Hand Span:  9”

Intelligence:  Above Average

Characteristics:

Explosiveness, Hand/Foot quickness, Strength, Intelligence

DEFENSIVE TACKLES

Height:  6’2”

Weight:  295 lbs

40-yd Dash:  4.95 sec

Arm Length:  32”

Hand Span:  9”

Intelligence:  Average

Characteristics:

Toughness, Strength, Hand/Foot quickness

SPECIAL TEAMS ______________________
LONG SNAPPERS

Height:  6’2”

Weight:  250 lbs

40-yd Dash:  5.2 sec

Arm Length:  31”

Hand Span:  9”

Intelligence:  Above Average

Characteristics:

Consistency, Snap velocity, Confidence, Intelligence

HOLDERS

Height:  6’0”

Weight:  200 lbs

40-yd Dash:  4.9 sec

Arm Length:  31”

Hand Span:  9”

Intelligence:  Above Average

Characteristics:

Soft hands, Consistency, Decision-making, Versatility, Intelligence

KICK RETURNERS

Height:  5’10”

Weight:  180 lbs

40-yd Dash:  4.45 sec

Arm Length:  31”

Hand Span:  9.5”

Intelligence:  Above Average

Characteristics:

Decision-making, Vision, Balance, Gear change, Intelligence

PUNTERS

Height:  6’2”

Weight:  190 lbs

40-yd Dash:  4.9 sec

Arm Length:  31”

Hand Span:  9”

Intelligence:  Above Average

Characteristics:

Launch speed, Ball control, Hang time, Intelligence

PLACE KICKERS

Height:  5’10”

Weight:  180 lbs

40-yd Dash:  4.9 sec

Arm Length:  30”

Hand Span:  9”

Intelligence:  Above Average

Characteristics:

Concentration, Distance, Consistency, Confidence, Intelligence

GUNNERS

Height:  5’10”

Weight:  190 lbs

40-yd Dash:  4.5 sec

Arm Length:  30”

Hand Span:  9”

Intelligence:  Average

Characteristics:

Body control, Range, Closing speed, Tackling